DJI Mini 2 Drone v Mavic Mini

Mini 2 v Mavic Mini.

The DJI Mini 2 is a brand new lightweight drone at a competitive price point – but how does it stack up against the original DJI Mavic Mini?

When DJI launched the Mavic Mini drone in October 2019, it was hailed as groundbreaking.

This teeny-tiny drone weighing sub-250g was something of a revelation.

Yet, for all its innovation, there were some niggles; notably the lack of a 4K camera.

Fast forward a year, and DJI has just released the Mavic Mini’s successor: the Mini 2.

So, how does this newbie compare? Has it addressed some of the quibbles? And is it worth shelving the original Mini for this rebooted version?

Our comparison blog takes a look.

Mini 2 v Mavic Mini – Design

The Mini 2 and the Mavic Mini are almost identical.

There isn't much between the Mini 2 and Mavic Mini in appearance.

Firstly, both aircraft are Mini by name, mini by nature, making each model incredibly portable.

Their take-off weight (without accessories) is sub 250g, with the Mini 2 slightly lighter at an incredible 242 grams, compared to the Mavic Mini at 249g.

As for their size:

Mini 2 Mavic Mini
Folded138 x 81 x 58 mm (L x W x H)140 x 81 x 57 mm (L x W x H)
Unfolded (without props)159 x 203 x 56 mm159 x 202 x 55 mm
Unfolded (with props)245 x 289 x 56 mm245 x 289 x 55 mm

Both drones also feature the iconic Mavic foldable frame design, adding to their portability.

The Mini 2 and original Mavic Mini also have 3-axis gimbals to help capture smooth content.

A distinguishing feature of the Mini 2 is its orange propeller tips.

The Mini 2 also has an additional front light, a clickable aircraft status indicator, and a smoother connection between the rear arm and the aircraft frame.

DJI Mini 2 Camera vs Mavic Mini Camera

Perhaps one of the biggest upgrades is the Mini 2’s camera.

Remember that quibble we mentioned earlier?

Well, DJI has addressed it!

Videographers will be delighted to hear that the Mini 2 can capture 4K 30fps video at 100Mbps.

This is compared to the Mavic Mini’s 2.7K 30fps at 40Mbps; something of a minor gripe when it was launched.

Mini 2 users will also benefit from the ability to save still images as JPEG and RAW – giving advanced editing options. Only JPEG was available on the Mavic Mini.

The Mini 2 also features a new zoom feature, with up to 4x (2x lossless in quality) while shooting at 1080p resolution. The Mavic Mini does not have zoom capabilities.

Both the DJI Mini 2 and Mavic Mini can capture 12MP images.

For all these new features, the Mini 2 does share some similarities with the original version.

For instance, they both have a 1/2.3 inch sensor and can capture 12MP images.

Other similarities include an 83° FOV and an f/2.8 aperture.

These are the vital camera statistics at a glance:

Mini 2Mavic Mini
Video4K 30fps2.7K 30fps
Max Video Bitrate100 Mbps40 Mbps
Image12MP12MP
Zoom4x zoomNot supported
Photo FormatJPEG / RAWJPEG
Sensor Size1/2.3” CMOS1/2.3” CMOS
Stabilisation3-axis (tilt, roll, pan)3-axis (tilt, roll, pan)

Mini 2 Shooting Modes vs Mavic Mini

To complement the upgraded camera, the Mini 2 has an impressive array of shooting modes to enable quality content creation.

Capture eye-catching content with the Mini 2.

These include a range of QuickShots such as Dronie, Helix, Rocket, and Circle; similar to the original Mavic Mini.

The Mini 2 has an extra QuickShots function; Boomerang. This enables the drone to fly around your subject, starting and stopping video in the same place.

Away from QuickShots, the Mini 2 has new features not found on the Mavic Mini.

For instance, the Mini 2 can capture panoramas, such as:

  • Sphere: Captures 25 images and stitches them together for a clear image.
  • 180°: Captures four photos for sweeping landscape images.
  • Wide: Captures a wide 3×3 image consisting of nine images.

Mini 2 also has 4K Hyperlapse; another feature that is not supported by the Mavic Mini.

The Mini 2 also features AEB Triple Shot, enabling you to take three images of varying exposure and merge them for a vivid image; as well as timed shots.

Mini 2 also includes the all-new Enhanced Photo. It allows you to download automatically enhanced photos directly in the DJI Fly app, which can be shared to social media almost instantly.

This content can be shared easily and intuitively through the DJI Fly app, which has undergone some advancements for the Mini 2 launch.

As a bonus, your phone can be directly connected to the Mini 2 without the remote controller and images can be downloaded at a high-speed rate of 20 MB/s, thanks to QuickTransafer mode.

And Trimmed Download makes it easy to cut a segment from a long video to edit and download.

With all this in mind, here’s an at-a-glance comparison between the drones’ intelligent shooting modes:

FeatureMini 2Mavic Mini
QuickShotsDronie, Circle, Helix, Rocket, and BoomerangDronie, Circle, Helix, and Rocket
Hyperlapse4KNot supported
PanoramasSphere, 180°and Wide-AngleNot supported
EditingEnhanced PhotoNot supported
DownloadingQuickTransfer, Trimmed DownloadNot supported

Flight Time and Range – DJI Mavic Mini vs Mini 2

The Mini 2 has a number of key upgrades when it comes to flight performance.

The addition of the OcuSync 2.0 transmission system is a very welcome move, and an improvement on the Mavic Mini using enhanced Wifi.

OcuSync 2.0 helps to ensure a stable and long-distance connection between the remote controller and the drone.

Mini 2 has OcuSync 2.0.

This, aided by dual-frequency switching to combat interference, is a major plus.

As a result, the Mini 2 is able to achieve a far greater transmission range, stretching up to 10 km in FCC-compliant areas, and 6 km in CE locations.

This is compared to the Mavic Mini’s 4 km maximum (FCC) and 2 km limit (CE).

Another quibble of the original Mavic Mini was its vulnerability to high winds; perhaps understandable given its tiny frame.

DJI has moved to address this issue by equipping the Mini 2 with upgraded motors, increasing the drone’s wind-speed resistance in the process.

As a result, the Mini 2 can handle winds of up to 10.5 m/s, compared to the 8 m/s limit of the original drone.

This increased durability means that the Mini 2 has a Level 5 wind-speed resistance (fresh breeze), compared to the Mavic Mini’s Level 4 rating (moderate breeze).

The Mini 2's flight performance has been upgraded, compared to the Mavic Mini.

In other departments, the Mini 2 is slightly quicker, with a maximum speed of 16 m/s (35.7 mph), compared to the Mavic Mini’s 13 m/s (29 mph).

There isn’t much difference in flight time. The Mini 2 can stay airborne for up to 31 minutes, compared to the original’s 30-minute endurance.

Here’s a quick-look breakdown of the key performance features of the Mini 2 and Mavic Mini:

Mini 2Mavic Mini
TransmissionOcuSync 2.0WiFi
Max Transmission Range10 km (FCC)
6 km (CE)
4 km (FCC)
2 km (CE)
Max Flight Time31 mins30 mins
Max Speed16 m/s (35.7 mph)13 m/s (29 mph)
Wind ResistanceLevel 5 (up to 10.5 m/s)Level 4 (up to 8 m/s)

How Much Is The Mini 2 Compared To The DJI Mavic Mini?

On launch, the Mini 2 is more expensive than the Mavic Mini was when it was first released.

The Mini 2 standard package is £419, while the Fly More Combo is £549.

The Fly More Combo (pictured) includes more accessories and so represents better value in the long run.

Mini 2 Fly More Combo.

To compare the difference between the Mini 2 standard and Fly More Combo, click here.

In contrast, the Mavic Mini standalone package was £369 on launch, and the Fly More Combo was £459.

However, as the Mini 2 is packed with superior features, it is perhaps no surprise that this new release has a higher price tag than the original version.

And staying below the £550 threshold still represents great value for such an innovative flying machine.

Which Accessories Are Compatible With the Mini 2 And The Mavic Mini?

A number of accessories are available for the Mini 2 and the Mavic Mini to help maximise flying fun and safety.

Some of these add-ons are compatible with both drones, others are exclusive to either the Mini 2 or the Mavic Mini.

AccessoryMini 2Mavic Mini
DJI Charging Display Base
Mini Bag +
Mini 2 360° Prop Guard
Mavic Mini 360° Prop GuardJapan version only
Mini 2 Two-Way Charging Hub
Mini 2 Props
Mavic Mini PropsJapan version only
Mavic Mini DIY Creative Kit
Mavic Mini Snap Adapter
Mavic Mini Prop Holder (Charcoal or Beige)
Mini 2 Intelligent Flight Battery
Mavic Mini Intelligent Flight Battery

DJI Mini 2 v Mavic Mini – Which should you buy?

It’s only been a year between the first Mavic Mini and the launch of the Mini 2.

So has DJI done enough to justify an upgrade?

Simply put, yes.

Like the Mavic Mini, the Mini 2 is a groundbreaking drone, packing so much power into a teeny-tiny frame.

Thankfully, the Mini 2 expands on these capabilities and addresses some of the issues from the original.

Gripes about the camera. Check! The rebooted Mini can now shoot 4K film, plus it has a zoom mode to boot. Images can now also be saved as RAW, as well as JPEG.

Vulnerability to wind. Check! Mini 2 benefits from upgraded props to give it extra resistance in breezy conditions.

Improved transmission. Check! OcuSync 2.0 has been included for a stronger, stable connection. This helps the Mini 2 achieve a superior transmission distance; far greater than its older sibling.

Perhaps the one frustration of the Mini 2 is that, like the first iteration, it does not come with object tracking capabilities.

The absence of ActiveTrack was certainly voiced by the drone community upon the release of the original Mini, so it is slightly disappointing that this is still missing.

But it is not the end of the world, and the Mini 2 is still a very capable drone for its size, with some important upgrades on the original version.

The Mini 2 standard and Fly More Combo are available from Heliguy.

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DJI Mini 2 v DJI Mavic Mini
Article Name
DJI Mini 2 v DJI Mavic Mini
Description
DJI has launched the Mini 2 drone. But how does it compare to its predecessor, the Mavic Mini? Find out in this in-depth comparison blog.
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Heliguy
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